Friday, January 6, 2017

Muna to Research at Notre Dame


This semester Professor Grace Muna is taking a research sabbatical to work in Professor Lieberman's group at University of Notre Dame to develop electrochemical paper-based analytical devices that screen pharmaceutical drugs as contaminants in water samples. Muna has successfully recruited and trained IU South Bend students in her laboratory over the years, but now she lends her experience to another laboratory where she can learn a few new skills as well.
 
 
Electrochemical detection for paper analytical devices is attractive because it offers excellent attributes such as high sensitivity and selectivity while providing low detection limits of the target analyte compared to colorimetric detection. Paper-based electrochemical detection also requires inexpensive instrumentation and portable hand-held potentiostats are commercially available for on-site measurements.  Both latter two features make these devices especially attractive in developing countries. 

Wednesday, January 4, 2017

Anderson To Develop Nanochemistry Course


If you are looking for a class with Professor Gretchen Anderson this semester, then you will have to wait.  Anderson is taking a break from teaching this semester to design a new freshman level course: N190 Introduction to Nanochemistry.  This survey course will have a laboratory component and will be based on a highly successful course developed by Professor George Lisensky at Beloit College. While surveying the remarkable applications of nanochemistry in industry and medical research, students will synthesize their own solar cells (partially from raspberry juice and titanium dioxide), conductive thin films, gold and silver nanoparticles, and a variety of semiconductors. This course will be one of a trio of courses to constitute a Nanoscience concentration as part of Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Biology BS degrees:

    Introduction to Nanochemistry (under development - an N190 course)
    Nanotechnology (offered Fall 2016 for the first time - an N390 course)
    Nanobiomedicine (under development by the Biological Sciences)
 
The nanoscience concentrations in various departments are expected to better serve the campus by introducing current students to this relatively new field - but are also expected to help grow the university by attracting students that otherwise might leave the local area in search of instruction in nanoscience and nanotechnology. Two of the three courses are designated "Natural World" courses to satisfy general education requirements.
 
Pictured at the top of this post is an artist's rendition of single-walled carbon nanotubes.  Each is essentially a sheet of graphene (one-atom thick version of graphite) rolled into a tube. The image is taken from the front page of the Journal Nanomaterial Chemistry and Technology. These nanotubes are remarkable in many ways: stronger than steel and excellent conductors of heat - some of them are even excellent electrical conductors. 

Tuesday, January 3, 2017

McMillen Promoted to Associate Vice Chancellor

Organic chemist Doug McMillen has been promoted to Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. He starts his new position this Spring semester, but will continue to lecture organic chemistry this semester only.  In the photograph he is receiving congratulations from Dean Dunn of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
 
McMillen has been a vital part of our department for two decades as our only organic chemist and has dominated the instruction of our sophomore chemistry students.  But during the last decade he has taken on part-time administrative duties and assumed temporary roles as dean when vacancies required someone to step up and take charge.  While we are sad to see McMillen leave teaching for administration, that is only because we will lose a dedicated and experienced teacher; we are very happy that he has this opportunity to grow professionally within the university and serve our students in a new manner.  Congratulations and Happy New Year!